Career Choices and The Real Skills Gap Crippling America [Infographic]

One of the more talked about trends in corporate America today: The skills gap.

We’ve all heard about it. And we should; after all, the skills gap threatens the sustainability of businesses around the world. And while a big part of that is a shortage of people skilled in the STEM (science, technology, education, and math) industries, a gap in soft skills such as communication and advanced leadership skills exists as well. Still, we could be worrying about the wrong skills gap.

The real danger to the American economic infrastructure: The lack of skilled laborers and technicians in the manufacturing sector and the trades.

The Real Skills Gap

What do most high school graduates tend to steer toward? Many look toward college. For them, the promise of excellent pay and a comfy 9-5 office complete with work/life balance is more attractive than a career in the trades.

As a result, those just entering the workforce shy away from the skilled labor fields. In fact, many students are counseled that going to college (and often taking on thousands of dollars of debt) is the only way to become successful. This, despite the fact that there is a surplus of solid, good-paying career opportunities in the trades. Trades that do not require a bachelor’s degree.

Sending their children to college was the dream of the baby boomer generation. But it has created an attitude in this country that a career in skilled labor or the trades represents a less successful life. As a result, America is on the verge skilled labor crisis. The shortage of technicians, tradesman, and skilled workers has a serious impact on our economy.

This infographic from WorkBoots.com explains the real skills gap and looks for ways to combat this Social Age phenomenon. Take a look, and decide if maybe a career in the skilled trades might be right for you!

After all, to fix the plumbing… you need a plumber.

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