Achievement-Based Resume: Make Yourself Look Marvelous!

Achievement-based ResumeWhat is the biggest mistake job seekers make on their resume today? They talk about what the tasks they performed instead of writing an achievement-based resume that demonstrates performance and results.

Writing an achievement-based resume enables a hiring manager, boss or colleague to focus on what you accomplished. This type of resume gives concrete examples of what you can do for your next potential employer or next promotion.

Writing achievement-based bullets are a sure-fire way to stand out from the crowd and increase your chances of being called in for an interview. Use our tips below to make the most of your achievement-based executive resume bullets.

Focus on CAR or STAR Formats

Using well respected interview techniques can make your resume writing process a lot easier when trying to focus on achievements.

CAR, for instance, stands for Context, Action, Result. The objective is to introduce a problem that you solved by providing the story behind it. STAR (Situation, Task, Action, Result) is similar in so far as you are also telling a story and highlighting how you are the hero in a situation.

If you’re writing a resume bullet you can call upon these two techniques to help you find content. Obviously you don’t have room to go into the entire story on your resume (save that for the interview!), but you can use it to help you find the achievements.

Ask yourself some key questions while writing bullets.

For every job description bullet, you should ask yourself “How do you know you did a good job?” or “What did that good job look like?”

This helps you focus on the results you achieved while at work. Ultimately, by helping yourself paint a picture you can then do the same for the person reviewing your resume.

It’s important to note that these numbers may not be so focused on revenue numbers. For example, if you are an HR Executive, you may have helped expand the company into new markets. That may read like this, “Led HR function on a 2014 expansion into Asian markets, which currently has 240 offices and 7000 employees.”

Focus on Size and Scope of Environments Worked.

When it comes to resumes, numbers talk. Figures can be extremely telling if what kind of environment you worked in and what results you accomplished.

For instance, strategic planning for a $5 million startup tech firm is a different job than strategic planning for a $200 million division of a $1.7 billion consumer products firm. So be specific with business situations when describing duties. This is when you can mention the size of budgets, number of employees and how much a company is worth.

Go ahead. Write an achievement-based resume. And watch your job search results increase dramatically.

 

For this post, YouTern thanks our friends at Chameleon Resumes.

 

chameleon resumes

 

Lisa RangelAbout the Author: Lisa Rangel, founder and managing director of Chameleon Resumes, a Forbes Top 100 Career Website. Lisa has helped hundreds land the exact job they want. A former recruiter, she is a 7-time certified resume writer and job search consultant. She is one of the few resume writers performing resume and job search-related work for LinkedIn. Lisa has been featured on Forbes, LinkedIn, Investors Business Daily, and many more publications. Follow Lisa on Twitter!

 

 

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