How to Create the Perfect One Page Resume

One pageSeventeen people. That’s how many Republicans have entered the 2016 race for president. It’s enough to make your head spin.

Now imagine if each candidate walked into your den and dropped off a multi-page resume with section after section of long-winded bullet points. All the information has merit, but Americans are busy people. We would prefer each candidate make his/her case in a nice ‘n neat one-pager.

In the job market, employers feel the same way. Bosses seldom have time for a two, three or four-page resume.

A resume isn’t about including everything. It’s about including the RIGHT things.

Still, you might have a lengthy internship and work history and think, “How am I supposed to put all of my jobs on one page?”

The answer is simple: limit the number of bullet points below each job.

The latest job receives the most description, but after that keep the bullet points to a minimum. It saves space and also helps the employer focus on your biggest achievement(s). Here’s an example (in this case, we used a person with four internships or jobs):

EXPERIENCE

COMPANY NAME | City, State | Start Date – End Date

Job Title

  • Explain the company and its general purpose (example from my resume template: Part of an organization that raises more than $8 million annually for cancer research)
  • Work accomplishment #1 (example: Grew organization’s social media presence 400% over two-year period)
  • Work accomplishment #2
  • Work accomplishment #3

COMPANY NAME | City, State | Start Date – End Date

Job Title

  • Explain the company and its general purpose
  • Work accomplishment #1
  • Work accomplishment #2

COMPANY NAME | City, State | Start Date – End Date

Job Title

  • Explain the company and its general purpose
  • Work accomplishment #1
  • (Work accomplishment #2 if space allows)

COMPANY NAME | City, State | Start Date – End Date

Job Title

  • Explain the company and its general purpose
  • Work accomplishment #1
  • (Work accomplishment #2 if space allows)

Notice how I give three work accomplishments for the latest job. Then, I provide two examples for job #2 and one each for jobs #3 and #4. That’s all the space I likely have.

Context is Critical

Each time, I include the bullet that explains the company mission and the type of work done.

This not only helps the employer understand the nature of the work; it makes it easier for the recruiter or hiring manager to understand how your contributions there may help you succeed in the role they have open.

Quantify!

Remember to rely on numbers/stats in each accomplishment statement!

Whenever possible, quantify how you contributed, overcame challenges or solved problems. Also, be sure to keep each bullet to no longer than two lines or text (after all, it is a bullet… not a paragraph).

Use the “So What? Test

Employers simply do not have time to read through your 2- and 3-page resume. It won’t happen! Keep the information concise and impactful by asking yourself two “so what?” questions for each line of text: :

  • Will the employer care?
  • Will this help me get the job interview?

If the answer is to both questions is no, leave it off the resume you’ll send to that employer!

This is how you create the perfect one page resume. This is how you impress employers.

 

For this post, YouTern thanks our friends at News to Live By!

 

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Danny Rubin AuthorAbout the Author: Danny Rubin is a communications expert for the millennial generation. He also writes the blog News To Live By, which highlights the career advice “hidden” in the headlines. His work has appeared on Huffington Post, Business Insider and the New York Times. Follow him @DannyHRubin

 

 

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