10 Rookie Mistakes You Can’t Make on LinkedIn

value 2Over 300 million job seekers have flocked to LinkedIn to network with fellow professionals and connect with employers.

Yet many of them actually hurt their personal network, and greatly reduce their chances of being contacted by a recruiter, because they make one or more of these 10 rookie mistakes on LinkedIn:

1. Not Having a Profile Picture

Before someone reads your LinkedIn profile, they’ve already formed a first impression of you. If you don’t have a photo for your LinkedIn profile, it’s very likely a person won’t connect with you.

2. Not Looking Like a Professional in Your Photo

If you have a LinkedIn photo, but it’s a picture of you and your cat, a recruiter or hiring manager may not take you seriously. While your LinkedIn photo doesn’t have to be a picture of you in a suit (or taken by a professional photographer), it should reflect the type of industry you’re trying to find a job in.

3. Having Typos in Your Profile

Spelling mistakes in your title, job description, or summary can ruin the impression you make on people who view your profile. Treat your LinkedIn profile like a resume you would send to an employer and make sure it is error-free.

4. Lacking a Descriptive Job Title

Job seekers need to be as detailed as possible in their job descriptions. Even if you’re unemployed, it’s important to include a description that illustrates your expertise.

For example, instead of writing “Student at University of Michigan” write “Public Relations and Advertising Senior at University of Michigan.” This will help recruiters and hiring managers find your profile when they search keywords relevant to your field.

5. Not Using LinkedIn Groups

LinkedIn groups are an excellent way to connect with professionals and employers in your field. Especially if you’re worried about connecting with strangers, LinkedIn groups help you connect with people who have common interests and experiences as you.

6. Using the Platform Only When You’re Looking for a Job

If you’re putting off networking until you need to find a job, then you’re doing it wrong. Whether you’re actively searching for a job or not, it’s essential to always be networking on LinkedIn. This will help you grow your network and build connections that will help you down the road.

7. Never Sharing Content on LinkedIn

LinkedIn is a great way to establish credibility for your brand as a professional. If you’re not sharing content, you’re missing out on the opportunity to build your personal brand. You can illustrate your expertise by sharing industry articles, trends, and blog posts.

8. Ignoring Your Network

The only way you’re going to learn about your network is if you engage with them and listen to conversations. Pay attention to your Activity feed, ask questions, and provide insight when needed. This will help you build stronger relationships and discover new opportunities.

9. Writing Boring Messages with LinkedIn Requests

Don’t send a generic message such as “I’d like to add you to my professional network on LinkedIn.” Instead, say something that’s genuine and more personal to help you create a stronger connection.

When you send a LinkedIn request, start by introducing yourself and briefly explain why you’d like to connect. This will make it easier to spark conversations once your request is accepted.

10. Not Using Advanced LinkedIn Search Options

LinkedIn serves as a gold mine of opportunities if you know how to use its advanced search options. As you look for jobs, be sure to customize your job search by searching keywords, locations, and specific employers.

 

For this post, YouTern thanks our friends at Come Recommended!

 

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olivia-adamsAbout the Author: Olivia Adams is the Brand Manager at Come Recommended. She is a graduate of Ferris State University with a B.S. in public relations. Olivia has experience in content marketing, writing, social media, branding, and public relations.

 

 

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