Career Blunders: 4 Ways to Be a Terrible Intern

internships-the-good-bad-and-ugly-L-2I9hxpWelcome to the School of Intern Mediocrity, where we’ll teach you the ins and outs of becoming an extraordinarily average worker.

Your internship has the possibility to give you meaningful experiences and important career lessons and connections that change your life entirely. Sounds like too much work to us!

Just go through the motions and follow our guide to gaining absolutely nothing from your internship and, in no time at all, your boss will be saying, “We have an intern?”

1. Take Even The Lousiest of Internships

After all, any internship is better than no internship at all, right?!

Who cares if you have horrible bosses that demand long hours, or if the internship consists of mostly meaningless work you’ll quickly hate – at least you can count it as college credit. Priorities, people!  Having a little ambition is a pretty risky path to take – if you just focus on graduating then everything will fall into place.

And besides, you should be grateful that someone even took you on in the first place. Sure you could have put in a little work and scored a top-rated internship at a really cool company that offered lots of growth and potential, but it’s much more comfortable to just wallow in mediocrity.

Who could blame you for deciding to just barely make it? To go through the motions?

2. Constantly Challenge Your Bosses

How else are they going to know you know just as much, if not more, than them?

You have to show you’ve got chops to make it, and telling your boss you learned it in class a different way is sure going to impress him. Prove that all the knowledge you’ve already gained and studying you’ve done in college has made you more than qualified to enter your industry – the only thing keeping you back is that darn degree.

Even though your internship has an all-star level training program, refuse to do things like make copies or take notes at the client meeting. You’re going to make it big someday, and concerning yourself with trivial tasks to help your bosses out makes you look weaker than a newborn baby.

3. Who Needs Networking?

You only wanted to be an intern so you could put it on your resume, right? Get in, do the job, get out – stick to the bare minimum.

Obviously you could find a mentor in the office – someone to personally teach you the ropes of the industry and introduce you to important connections so you can build your network and get a shot at a full-time career. But why bother when you can just request the entire office on LinkedIn and then never talk to them again?

You can still put the internship on your resume, so it’d be silly to bother your bosses with introductions, connection recommendations and networking advice. After all, the ‘experience’ is all that matters anyway!

4. Learn More About Internships From TV

Watch every office television show you can that depicts interns in some way, shape, or form. This is now your internship bible, and you will follow exactly what the characters do and nothing else.

Get that coffee, scan those documents, organize every file bin in the office – if you saw it on TV it has to be something worth emulating!

Maybe you’ll finally get an opportunity to do some real, practical, meaningful work during your internship. When faced with this intimidating responsibility, simply immerse yourself in self-deprecation the entire time and do such a horrible job that your bosses will never ask you to do real work ever again.

Leave all that career stuff to the real workers… you’re just an intern!

 

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For this post, YouTern thanks our friends at Come Recommended!

 

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alex macsoudAbout the Author: Alex Macksoud is a senior at Central Michigan University studying advertising with a minor in marketing. Aside from being a content creator trainee, Alex is also a social media trainee at Come Recommended. He has heaps of experience in advertising, social media, public relations, content creation, SEO, and marketing – mainly from internships and leadership roles in student organizations

 

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