The Branding X Factor: How Do Others Perceive Your Value?

XAre you acutely aware of your personal brand? Do you know how others perceive your contribution and value?

If you were asked right now, at this moment, could you clearly and passionately articulate your “X” factor?

In today’s work environment, your personal brand is an essential tool for thriving and driving your career. Whether you’re strengthening your career inside your current organization or looking for a new job, defining “YOU” is critical for success.

By identifying what makes you unique and what you want to achieve in your marketplace, you gain more power over your strategy for reaching your professional goals.

Many workplaces are moving toward a “project based” environment where your growth opportunities are decided upon by what you (You, Inc.) are known for, what others perceive as your value or special “X” factor that you will bring to the team.

Projects are a great way to grow and develop your brand by working on new challenges, expanding your comfort zone, working toward specific deliverables and hopefully measurable results.

Branding helps you focus on how you explain to others what you do, the value you add and why you do what you do. You need to be able to clearly communicate your unique abilities and guide yourself to the projects and work experiences that will help elevate your career.

Define yourself. Your personal brand takes a frank look under-the-hood, a bit of self-discovery.

Start by asking yourself (and others) these questions:

  • Who are you and what do you stand for?
  • What is unique and different about you?
  • What do you bring to the “marketplace” you have chosen to work in?
  • How do people who know you best describe you, your strengths, your weaknesses, your approach?
  • What qualities do you want people to associate with you?

Bottom Line – What do you want to be known for? … What descriptors do you think of when the following names or companies are discussed? Apple, Simon Cowell, HP, Marissa Mayer, Jerry Seinfeld, Quintin Tarantino, Mark Zuckerberg, Michael Phelps, Bono, Southwest Airlines, your immediate boss, your mentor … you get the idea.

Once you’ve defined your brand – sync it up with your personal mission statement and vision for your future. Chart your course just as any CEO would do. While working your plan – always assess decisions along the way as to how they relate to your personal brand.  Does this decision support my plans for the future – are they representative of my brand and help me achieve my ultimate goal?

As with all brand messaging – be clear in not only your actions, “walk-the-talk” but in all forms of communications and media such as your LinkedIn, Facebook, resume, website, online bio, etc. They should all be conveying the same image.

You are unique and you deserve a brand. You need an “X” Factor.

What is it going to be? What value will others see… in you?

 

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For this post, YouTern thanks our friends at People Results!

 

 

Shelli WalkerAbout the Author: Shelli Walker is a Partner with PeopleResults. Follow her on Twitter or connect via email.

 

 

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  • Interesting points! I liked the mini-questionnaire so much that I went ahead and copied it into a document, then answered all the questions. By using several text summarizing applications, then pasting the text into Wordle to make a word cloud (for a sort of visual ‘summary’), I’ve come to a better understanding of what my personal brand is – I’ve even got something that resembles a slogan. It might just encapsulate my own ‘x-factor’. Now, I’ll see how everything fits together with my Good.Co archetype profile and see if I can’t pull together a solid mission statement. The perfect LinkedIn profile is as good as mine. Thanks for the fantastic food for thought!
    Cheers! Lisa Chatroop, Good.Co

    • YouTern

      ” I liked the mini-questionnaire so much that I went ahead and copied it into a document, then answered all the questions.”

      You’re making us proud, Lisa.

      It’s one thing to just go through the motions in your head and think, “Yeah, I can do that…” But when you actually go through the actual exercise, you get SO much more out of it because you have to think about it. You can edit your initial thoughts and improve them. You get a much better end result.

  • Venkateswaran Neelkantan

    I have reinvented myself, while Reading this!
    Not all but unconsciously I have sought answers for one or two of these questions, while discussing in an interview and in those times, it helped me in crossing the bridge!
    Thanks

  • Hi Shelli,

    I guess the x-factor is determined by:

    – Your loyalty to you clients
    – The value that you add to your clients
    – The professionalism and the sound advice you give to your clients

    The x-factor is never determined by one’s self, it is determined by the client. That’s my opinion based on my experience in the IT world anyway.