Social Media Profiles: Now More Important Than Your Resume?

LikeIs your personal Internet reputation now more important than your resume?

Yes! Each day, billions of searches are run on Google… and many of them are done by recruiters looking for that perfect candidate.

Before you submit another application or go to your next job interview, you have some important searches to make…

Get Googled

Jump on the nearest computer and Google yourself. Say your name is Susie Chapstick.  Use the following search string: “Susie Chapstick” or (susie & chapstick) or “Susan Chapstick” or (susan & chapstick) or ((susie or susan) & chapstick & [current company name]). Be ready to speak to any ‘interesting results’ which may appear.

Knowing what is out there is your first step to fixing anything negative.

Stop by Facebook

Make sure you are logged out of FaceBook, so you can see what a possible employer would see when searching you for results. Make sure all of your photo albums are set to PRIVATE and that even your Wall Photos are not visible to someone who is not your friend.

No one really needs to see what you wore or drank on Halloween last year (although I’m sure both were truly amazing).

Are You Linked?

Your next step is to be sure your professional presence on LinkedIn has a great picture and a strong representation of your background. Do the things you state in your LinkedIn profile truly match what is on your resume? At CareerBliss, we have seen folks not get hired because their resume did not match their LinkedIn profile.

Whether it is dates, data or the explanation of your duties, make sure to show a consistent (and honest) value proposition.

Search CareerBliss on Your Current Company

How is your company ranked in their region? Do people truly like working there? Are you proud to work there? If so, why are you thinking of leaving? Be prepared to answer that and more at your next interview.

If your company has a negative reputation, do not dwell on it in the interview or the interviewer will wonder why you took the job in the first place.  Focus on what you like about the company and how you are looking for a new job to face new challenges and assist a wonderful company such as [company I am sitting in front of now wearing my newly bought suit] as they grow to an even more successful entity.

Research the Prospective Company

Search Bing or Google for your current company to get additional information about your prospective company. What are their recent press releases? Are they well liked in the media? Knowing what is going on in all possible areas of your company helps you look well informed at your interview.

Run a CareerBliss search on the company which is going to be interviewing you. Make sure that they are a company you want to tie your personal brand to for years to come. Ensure you are prepared to answer the infamous, “Why do you want to work for [our incredible company]” question.

The Internet reputation of you, your current or past employers and your prospective employers all have an effect on your job search and interviewing process and, ultimately, your success.  Protecting your personal brand as much as possible – and choosing companies who do the same – is key to your CareerBliss.

 

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For this post, YouTern thanks our friends at CareerBliss!

 

CareerBliss

 

Heidi-GolledgeAbout the Author: Heidi Golledge is the Founder and CEO of Cyber Coders and CareerBliss, two tech companies based in Irvine, Calif. Both companies are focused on finding you joy and success in every step of your career! Connect with Heidi on Twitter!

 

 

 

This entry was posted in Career Advice, Job Interviews, Job Search, Resumes, Social Media and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
  • You should also try and research those you may be working with. Nothing can make you hate your future job more than if the culture isn’t right for you. To determine this, look at the social platforms of the ones at the top, such as team leaders or executives. This can help you to formulate the work culture, and whether or not you think your personality is suited for it.

    • Culture is so often overlooked. No matter how much money you make (money is often a job seeker’s top consideration), you spend so much of your life at work… if the culture is wrong for you, the money won’t even come close to making up for the daily misery.

  • Megan Rene Burkett

    While I think your social media profiles are important there are a couple of points that my view differs. I actually don’t have my Facebook pictures on private because if a potential employer cares to take the time to sort through my pictures that is a major time investment and I have nothing to hide. Additionally, in regards to my LinkedIn matching my resume I prefer for my LinkedIn profile to be a complete story of my career journey and tailor my resume for the particular opportunity. Raising awareness on the importance of social media profiles in today’s job search economy.

    • You make a good point about your slight difference between your resume and LinkedIn profile, Megan.

      The idea, though, isn’t to make your resume and LI profile match word for word. The message in this post is to make sure the two are consistent… that you don’t have discrepancies in dates, titles, companies, etc. These can be red flags to recruiters.

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