Your Resume Is Great! So, Now What?

Job searching needs to be a diversified effort. You can’t put all your eggs in one basket. Yet many people believe the only way to job search these days is to go online, post their resume to a job board, and spend time searching through the job boards looking for openings.

Yes, this is a piece of the job search puzzle, folks. But it’s not the whole pie. You can’t rely on job boards alone to find a job. That makes your job search a numbers game, and you would have to spend 40 hours a week on every job board you could find applying for every position you are even remotely qualified for—literally applying for hundreds of jobs a week to get a few call-backs and maybe one or two interviews.

Don’t fall into the trap of believing a job board is the only place to find employment. Below are some great ways to diversify your search and open some doors.

Social Networking

Facebook: I read a surprising statistic the other day: These days, more people are finding employment on Facebook than they are on LinkedIn. I was shocked. I had to investigate that a little further. But I suppose it isn’t all that far-fetched, considering all the companies that are on Facebook—not to mention the 950 million people there.

My recommendation here: Use Facebook to scout out companies you would like to work for to see if there are any openings listed on its page—and then apply if there are. If there aren’t, do some poking around; you may find a contact name you could send your resume and cover letter to.

Twitter: Twitter, people! Go get your tweet on—or at least get on there and search for openings. Did you know that there are more searches performed on Twitter every day than on the largest search engine? Don’t know who to follow? Follow @GreatResume and check out our followers. I have a lot of recruiters on Twitter who follow me—and that I follow—who post jobs every single day.

LinkedIn: Professional networking is a must! Get on LinkedIn, join groups related to your industry (great place to find jobs and get your foot in the door), and start making connections with people. Don’t just copy and paste your resume—put some time and effort into developing a search engine-optimized profile that will get you noticed.

Recruiters, hiring managers, and companies conduct searches for people on LinkedIn every day to find someone who would be a great match for their organization. Our clients always place high in search results. Need more info on LinkedIn? Check this info out.

Also, one more tip: Make sure your profile is 100% complete. It helps you to place well in search results.

In-Person Networking

Buy some networking cards. Include a link to your LinkedIn profile on your business card, professional blog, online resume, etc. It’s a great way to direct people to find out more about your professional experience and expertise. Don’t hesitate to give one to everyone you meet. Also, find local meetings for professional associations related to your industry/profession. Attend these when and where possible, and start working on your elevator speech.

Good Old-Fashioned Snail Mail

Believe it or not, mail still works. Target companies you want to work for, research the hiring manager’s name, and mail him or her a copy of your resume and cover letter. You would be surprised how you’ll find out about positions you didn’t even know were open and how you’ll get a better response rate than just working the job boards.

Think Outside the Box

Really get out there and think outside the box. Create a job search website that includes your resume and professional background. Consider other means of searching for employment that you’ve never thought of before. In today’s job market (and amidst the dismal unemployment rate) it’s important to BE REMEMBERED. So do something memorable (but professional, people).

And for goodness’ sake, if you’re going to sit on the job boards all day, spend some of that time finding some really awesome NICHE job boards that are right up your alley—or in this case, industry—and post your resume there. It usually costs employers less to post openings on Niche boards, and they know they’ll be getting candidates within only that specified field.

 

About the Author: A nationally recognized resume expert, Jessica Hernandez is President/CEO of Great Resumes Fast and a former human resources manager and recruiter. With more than ten years’ experience directing hiring practices for Fortune 500 companies, she has developed innovative and proven resume development, and personal branding strategies to generate powerful results for clients. As a global resume authority and trusted media source, Jessica has been featured and quoted on CNN.com, Monster.com, Job Talk America radio, SmartBrief, International Business Times, and more. Jessica has her Bachelor of Science degree in Communications/Public Relations from the University of North Florida. Contact Jessica on Twitter!

 

 

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  • This is all great advice. A good resume is important, but it’s certainly not the end of the line when it comes to the job hunt. I especially liked your advice for job seekers to consider outside the box ideas.One such idea is to record a video resume. A video resume can allow candidates to show off their personality, communication skills, and passion for the job earlier in the hiring process. Plus, odds are you’re more persuasive in person than on a piece of paper.

  • Hi Spark Hire!

    Exactly. Any productive way one can find to stand out from the hundreds of other resumes gets one closer to being hired. Job seekers must make sure whatever they do, it has to be the best quality… ie flawless… as it represents them to someone who doesn’t know them, and someone who is looking to hire the BEST candidate.

    Dave Ellis
    Community Manager and Content Manager
    YouTern