Infographic: Job Interview Best Practices and Etiquette

An interview is not just about your qualifications for the job — it’s about your behavior, personality, and professionalism, too. Proper interviewing etiquette can be the difference between getting the offer and getting your resume tossed.

Rasmussen College produced an infographic, seen here along with an interview on AOL Jobs, about interviewing etiquette and best interview practices to help job seekers make the best first impression.

Tamryn Hennessy, national director of career development at Rasmussen College, says research on the company is important to prepare yourself for and continue the dialogue in an interview.

“If you are not prepared and you face a difficulty in an interview, it can really strip all of your confidence,” said Hennessy in an interview with AOL Jobs. “The more you prepare in advance the more you will be able to regain your composure.”

Rasmussen College’s career services office also advise that job seekers bring copies of their resumes and cover letter to an interview, silence their cell phones, and, of course, arrive on time (for more tips on staying professional during an interview, see here).

Below is the infographic from Rasmussen College:

As is evident from these tips, your behavior before an interview can help the interview go well and your behavior after the interview can reinforce the great impression you made. Professionalism can make or break your interview, so take note of these best practices and interviewing etiquette.

How do you stay professional during an interview? Any tips? Share below!

 

For this post, YouTern thanks our friends at ComeRecommended!

 

About the Author: Kate D’Amico is in her senior year at Virginia Tech where she is studying communications with an emphasis in public relations as well as psychology and special events management and marketing. She has prior internship experience in corporate communications and public relations for technology, nonprofit, and association clients.

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  • http://twitter.com/profkrg Kenna Griffin

    There is a lot of good advice here. However, there are two points with which I disagree. First, I think you should always use a formal title with the person conducting the interview. For example, if you were interviewing with me, I may introduce myself as “Kenna,” but an interviewee should call me “Professor Griffin” or “Mrs. Griffin.” These are appropriate titles for someone who doesn’t know me. Second, I think you should offer to pay for your meal. You don’t have to be obnoxious about it, but simply offering to pay your part is good manners.

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